Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France
POITEAU, Pierre-Antoine

Pomologie francaise. Recueil des plus beaux fruits cultivés en France

Paris
Langlois et Leclercq
1846
Size : 440x335mm
Color : Contemporary colors
Condition : Très bon
Technique : Lithography
Reference : 219-3
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Description

4 volumes in-folio, 423 plates after Poiteau and Turpin, of which 420 remarkably lithographed in colors by the specialized lithographers Bouquet, Leuleu, Gabriel, Massard, Bocourt, H. Legrand, Allais, Rodrigue, Giraud and Dubreuil, and enhanced by hand at the time. Contemporary green half-maroquin with corners, spines decorated, boards covered with green marbled paper, upper edges gilt. Some light spotting to the text, some plates slightly browned with some light spotting. Very nice set, generally clean and fresh.

Famous and monumental work summarizing the essential knowledge on fruits cultivated in France, ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BOOKS ON FRUITS. French Pomology is not only the study of apples as is sometimes believed; it is devoted to the study, identification and inventory of all edible fruits.

The volumes have a total of 423 plates composed of a large representation of the fruit on the branch, with sometimes a representation of the flower of the tree, of the open fruit, of cups... Volume I is devoted to almonds, peaches, apricots and plums, volume II to the vine, cherries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, lemons..., volume III to currants and pears, and finally volume IV to hazelnuts, chestnuts, figs and a luxurious assortment of apples... The 4 volumes are all presented in the same way, namely: a written presentation of the species on a few pages, followed by the different varieties illustrated by a plate and an explanatory note indicating the specialty of the fruit, its gustatory qualities, its date of maturity, .... The painter is, of course, Poiteau, but the engraving is entrusted to several engravers including Bocourt, Bouquet and Gabriel.

POITEAU, Pierre-Antoine

Of very modest extraction, Pierre-Antoine Poiteau (1766-1854), also nicknamed Antoine or Alexandre Poiteau, began as a gardener's boy at the Museum of Natural History. His curiosity and intellectual qualities (he studied Linné's system) soon made him noticed by Daubenton who sent him to found a rural school in Dordogne during the Revolution. He then went to Haiti and undertook the new botanical garden of the Cape. He returned to France in 1803 loaded with thousands of exotic seeds that he had named and prepared. He was appointed director of the royal nurseries of Versailles in 1815, became chief gardener of the castle of Fontainebleau in 1821 and then of the museum of natural history. The important work of French Pomology was first drafted in 1835 under the name of Duhamel du Monceau and the title Traité des arbres fruitiers. The botanists Poiteau and Turpin had taken up and increased the texts, sometimes unpublished, of the eighteenth century scholar by accompanying them with plates. After Turpin's death, Poiteau completed, improved and republished under his own name the initial finished work in 250 issues published over 10 years, which explains the difficulty of finding complete copies in period bindings. "The lithographer Bouquet, whose predestined name appears on all the great botanical books of the Romantic period, was solicited for this long and precise work. He was able to render the density and velvetiness of certain fruits (especially peaches) with masterly skill.

Nissen, BBI, 1554; Michaud, Biogr. Universelle, XXXIII, 602; Brunet, IV, 775; W. Blunt and W. Stearn, The Art of Botanical Illustration, p.208; Bradley III, p.84 (calling erroneously for 431 plates); H.F. Janson, Pomona's Harvest, pages 297 & 401; Oak Spring Pomona 31; Nissen BBI 1554; Sitwell page 93 (note); cf. Stafleu & Cowan 1548.